Monday, March 02, 2009

Who's that girl?

This one's pretty easy, if you can reel in a few years.

Stumped? Here,s a clue: The photographer got to see more than her face -- and so did a lot of other people.

Time's up: No winners today. It is, of course, Waneek Horn-Miller, the former Canadian Olympic water polo team member who sparked one of several controversies by taking off her clothes for Time magazine in 2000. Daughter of a Mohawk activist, she has ties to the South Shore Kahnawake Indian reserve.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Lise Watier, O.C.?

Mr. Peabody

Sterno said...

Newp.

Taylor said...

This is non other than famed lyricist and multi-platinum recording artist Ghostface Killah, a member of the Wu Tang Clan.

Anonymous said...

Looks almost Like Julie Couillard, but she has blue eyes

Kristian said...

Easy for you! I didn't know who it was even after youze told me!

Anonymous said...

Waneek's actually got a really interesting life story. As a kid, she was stabbed in the chest by a soldier during the Oka crisis. She works at McGill now and looks as good.

Seth said...

Ummm...did I miss something? The soldiers weren't wielding knives (and stabbing people - especially little girls) during the Oka "crisis", were they?

SMD said...

From http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/women/002026-234-e.html:

[...] life for Waneek has not just been a series of sporting competitions. She first made headlines when she was involved, at age 14, in the Oka crisis in the summer of 1990. She was stabbed in the chest by a soldier’s bayonet. The wound was mitigated because the bayonet blade was deflected off her sternum but a serious scar remains. As frightening and hurtful as this event was, Waneek overcame her bitterness towards non-Native people with the support of family (especially her mother, Kahn-Tineta Horn) and friends in an effort to make something of her life. Her determination and winning attitude is evident in the following quote: “I could’ve become really racist and done nothing with that experience. I could’ve really isolated myself, but I went through Oka for a reason and I decided not to let it hinder me; I’m going to let it do something for me” (Windspeaker, May 1996).

Anonymous said...

i think waneek horn-miller is a very honest kind-hearted prson who wants to make a difference in the world and her peoples lives