Sunday, February 24, 2013

Mo' Mtl tram porn: ogle, identify, appreciate








10 comments:

MTLaise said...

You have posters here who actually worked in the industry! Love their inputs!
But I must say these methods of transport for the masses look both organic and so so elegant in their place.Wonder just where the old trams went to die?
Also, they seem non-obtrusive. But having lived with them in Europe, I know they can occasionally have their problems. Friend of mine had both hands shattered in a massive tram crash. She got justice, and I am sure that there aren't that many accidents overall with trams.
Pity it ain't feasible in Montréal.

emdx said...

First one is easy: Côte St-Paul bridge, seen from Ville Émard, looking towards Westmount.

#2 is in Lachine, on the single track portion.

#3 is on the 44 avenue wye in Lachine.

#4 is along Henri-Bourassa, right at the Montréal Nord city limits.

#5 Also along HB, near Papineau.

#6 The PCC is going south on Park, just north of Mont-Royal.

#7 The PCC
is going north on McGill at Hay Market, er, Victoria².

M. P. and I. said...

Coolopolis Streetcars. Part 1.

Well, there is a lot to say to improve the locations of these wonderful photos of an era long past.

For informational purposes here is a 1948 Tramways' Track Diagram which can be used to plot locations of Tramway photos on Coolopolis.

http://bp3.blogger.com/_H_qVyVvy8AI/Rt_3PniUVMI/AAAAAAAAC0Y/3Hx9mXhLxK0/s1600-h/Image0046.jpg

Photo 1. Streetcar is proceeding South across Cote St. Paul Bridge over the Lachine Canal and will go down Church directly behind camera.

Streetcars on Route 25 were removed in August 1953. When I was young we came down this way a few times and I enjoyed the car clattering and banging across the rail joints on the bridge, which swings to let ships in the canal pass, and over the CPR Canal Bank Spur which paralleled the Canal and St. Patrick from LaSalle thru to the now-open swing bridge at Wellington and Bridge.

The trolley wires had a marvelous way of disconnecting when the bridge was to be swung.

( Ditto when the CNR Double-Span lift bridge at Wellington and Bridge had to be raised. )

The CPR had a small yard to the East/Right of photo where locomotives and cabeeses were kept on the weekend and we were allowed, with CPR's permission, to climb on them.


Photo 2. Streetcar is facing West on Broadway in Lachine detraming it's passengers at the end of Rte 91 Lachine ex Place D'Armes.

When the Conductor on the rear platform gives the 'Back Up' signal on his pull cord which rang a small bell above the Motorman, the car would back East/North onto 44th where it would sit, as in a recent previous Coolopolis view, boarding passengers for the trip back downtown to Place D'Armes, via Dominion Bridge, St. Pierre, CC&F, Turcots West and East and St. Remi.

Cars of the type shown were dependable, heavy and admirably suited to suburban service, especially in winter ( usually). This class of car was constructed in 1913-14 and most made 40 years of service, only being retired as Autobuses took over in the Fifties.

http://www.imagescn.technomuses.ca/road/index_view.cfm?photoid=42101568&id=34

91 car at latter end of line at Dominion Bridge, 6th Ave, Lachine.

http://davesrailpix.com/mtc/htm/mtc22.htm

These cars had 'class' and were fun to ride. Til they were gone.

The Autobus to the Left is a Provincial Transport Co. Can/Car Brill w/ sliding windows, which, I ASSUME, will travel West along the Lakeshore thru Dorval, etc.

M. P. and I. said...

Coolopolis Streetcars. Part 2.

Photo 3. This one-man, bi-directional car, two trolley poles, 4-doors, is at the end of steel at Rene Huguet and 56th. in Lachine. Rte. 92 also used the Wye, if required, at the East end of it's run at 44th. in previous photo.

Car has all-red doors and pre-1952 crest. Rte. 92 came off in April 1951.

House shown on Google is to right rear of streetcar in Coolopolis view.

http://maps.google.com/?ll=45.44014,-73.718991&spn=0.000015,0.007639&t=m&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.440217,-73.719014&panoid=LTwBoRwumdskrmHuZKvveA&cbp=13,261.59,,0,0.73

Rte 92 car turning North on 45th, Lachine.

http://www.memorablemontreal.com/document/image/original/HM_ARC_003513-001.jpg


Photo 4. MTC 2064 is facing West at Limites having just arrived from Pigeon/Gouin/Mtl. Nord. Another Double-end car, two trolley poles, 4 doors. The doors on 'this' side in photo not being used with the left end as front.

There is an electric track switch under the front wheels, operated by the Motorman thru a trolley wire contactor, and the car will turn left onto curved track, go around loop, and head back to Pigeon/Gouin on the single track. See 1948 Map.

The Tower Car in a recent Coolopolis view would have been on straight track to right by Taxi stand.

Google view. Note brick building on North side.

http://maps.google.com/?ll=45.581245,-73.651241&spn=0.000004,0.00191&t=m&z=19&layer=c&cbll=45.581064,-73.651322&panoid=LYoyf4c1du9DcuNLk1rAPg&cbp=13,325.57,,0,-4.19


Photo 5. Double-end car heading East on Henri Bourassa at Papineau on Route 24 Millen.

Changes coming, witness new sidewalks and boarded-up building for demolition??

Tramways' shelters were almost always located on 'Inbound' side of tracks for majority of passengers that had to wait for a car to arrive.

Detraming passengers left stop immediately for home and no shelter required for them.

Hard to believe this is the same location.

http://maps.google.com/?ll=45.570054,-73.658202&spn=0.000004,0.00191&t=m&z=19&layer=c&cbll=45.570261,-73.658691&panoid=VbvCuyj0T7ZMQCisigfj7Q&cbp=13,52.46,,0,8.57

Thank You, Coolopolis!!

JM said...

MTLaise,

Except for the ones in museums (Delson, QC; Kenebunkport, ME, East Windsor, CT), all were scrapped.

The cars were operated to Youville Shops on Cremazie until with all the route abandonments, there wasn't enough track left to get there from the various carbarns. The last streetcars in the very late 1950s were trucked to Youville.

Any fittings that could be reused were removed. The cars were then pulled off their wheel assemblies (trucks) and rolled onto their sides using cables attached to a little electric work locomotive. The car bodies were set on fire to get rid of any non-metallic material. Montreal firemen were stationed at fireboxes so alarms wouldn't be pulled by nearby residents who might not have known what was burning. The burnt-out hulks were then sold as scrap metal.

The MTC hoped to sell the newest streetcars in the fleet, which were the 18 (Numbers 3500 to 3517) streamlined PCC cars. These cars had been synonymous with the Outremont route and then on the Rosemont route during the final years. These cars had gone into service in 1944, barely 15 years earlier, so they still had many years of service left. Unfortunately streetcar systems in most North American cities were being discontinued or had already been discontinued so there were no buyers. The cars sat behind the Youville Shops until 1963, four years after the streetcar system had been shut down. They were finally trucked to a scrap yard and the final 17 PCC cars were scrapped. The last new streetcar in that group received by Montreal, number 3517, was chosen to be preserved at Exporail in Delson. It had also been the last streetcar in the final parade at the end of service on Papineau and Rosemont in 1959.

M. P. and I. said...

When streetcars had been removed from service, they went to Youville Shops under their own power when tracks and trolley wires were still in place to do this, where they were burnt.

In 1958 much track and wire were removed in the City, leaving two streetcar barns NOT connected with Youville Shops by rail and wire..

Mount Royal car barns and the car barns in St. Henri at the Glen were isolated and their cars were moved by truck to Youville for burning once these routes converted to Autobuses in 1959.



At their end, cars for Routes 24 Millen and Rte 40 Montreal North were based out of Youville Shops after the Defleurimont/St. Denis shops were closed in 1958.

Rte 24 and 40 cars between runs at Youville Shops. Soon they would all be burnt just to the North of here.

http://transit.toronto.on.ca/images/streetcar-4753-13.jpg

Older streetcars had much interior wood and rattan ( wicker ) seats and would burn quite readily.

MTC. and the Fire Dept. would orchestrate streetcar burnings, usually in winter, and at nite to follow the sparks, these events receiving coverage in the media.


Preparing to lift streetcar onto truck from Mount Royal Car Barns to Youville for burning.

http://www.stm.info/en-bref/tramways/images/S61113/S611134_10.jpg

Note faux brick arch beyond car in which the doors were closed behind last regular car and historic parade car on last day of service.

We were there, and got SOAKED!!

Mount Royal and Fullum, Looking East. Former Power House on NE Corner.

http://maps.google.com/?ll=45.537535,-73.570268&spn=0.000015,0.007639&t=m&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.537427,-73.57029&panoid=vVNj2gLDAagYzR7VRyIYnw&cbp=13,356.56,,0,-10.46

Last Day streetcar article. Scroll Down.

http://www.stm.info/en-bref/30aout1959.pdf

Looking North. Location of Faux Arch.

http://maps.google.com/?ll=45.538256,-73.570064&spn=0.000015,0.007639&t=m&z=17&layer=c&cbll=45.538307,-73.570171&panoid=szhkAekEBjyk-y9kQRxfzw&cbp=13,313.18,,0,-11.58


Removing streetcar from it's trucks for burning at Youville Shops.

http://www.stm.info/en-bref/tramways/images/S61113/S611134_17.jpg

By rolling them over and over, streetcars were broken up for burning.

http://www.stm.info/en-bref/tramways/images/S61113/S611134_16.jpg

Cars burning.

http://www.stm.info/en-bref/tramways/images/S61113/S611134_18.jpg

Tramways Electric Locomotives 5001-02 were used to pull cars over with cables wrapped round and around cars.

HOWEVER!! The 18 PCC cars from 1944, 3500-17 as shown in photos Nos. 6 and 7 above were held at Youville Shops thru 1963 for possible sale.

When the land was required for the future Metro and the Shops to be demolished, the Historic cars were moved to the CRHA at Delson/St Constant for preservation, along with PCC 3517, and the remaining 17 PCC cars sent by truck to St. Lawrence Iron and Metal on the waterfront South of Montreal Locomotive Works at Dickson where they were torn apart by cranes.

In 1968 TTC sent many of their older PCC cars to Egypt.

CPR and CNR sent legions of their obsolete MLW 244-engined Diesels to St. LI&M. after they wre stripped at MLW for reuseable parts.

Old Canadian Locomotive Company Opposed Piston Diesel locomotives were sent unstripped from CNR to ST.LI&M.

Links.

http://amistramwaysmontreal.org/

http://www.stm.info/en-bref/index.htm

Thank You.

JM said...

MTLaise,

They may seem unobtrusive, but on city streets they weren't. Unless you were a streetcar fan, most people at the time were happy to be rid of them.

There were so many routes using downtown parts of St. Catherine, the headway between streetcars was often just seconds. Downtown portions of Craig (St. Antoine), Notre Dame, St. James (St. Jacques) were also busy with several routes. Out of downtown, both St. Denis and Park Avenue too featured multiple routes. If there was a problem, like a fire, derailment or accident and an inspector wasn't quickly onsite to detour the cars (if possible), they would quickly start lining up behind each other causing major delays. A bus would simply detour on any nearby street.

Before the great increase in car and truck traffic especially after World War II, streetcars were the fastest way to get around. As they started sharing the roads with increasing numbers of other vehicles (already starting by the early 1920s), service gradually started slowing down.

The only exceptions were routes that for the most part had their own private rights-of-way like the 17 Cartierville, 40 Montreal Nord, 93 Lachine Extension, and routes using the private rights-of-way north from Cremazie to Ahuntsic and then east to the then City Limits. The 92 Lachine route also had a long stretch on its own right-of-way from west of about today's Avenue de Carillon to near today's William Macdonald and 6th Ave. in Lachine.

A unique feature of Montreal streetcars is readily apparent in these photos. Montreal streetcars did not have headlights. Note the "cowling" just below the front windshields. There were several lightbulbs screwed in vertically under the cowling, which somewhat lit up the advertisements and the front of the car. Streetcars assigned to routes with lots of private right-of-way running however, had portable headlights hung on the front.

To prevent serious injuries, Montreal streetcars (like in many cities) had bars on the left side windows. This would prevent passengers from sticking their arms or heads out the windows possibly getting clipped by other streetcars going in the opposite direction, which had close clearances.

MTLaise said...

Thanks, JM and others.
It does indeed seem that the rosy-tinted glasses got the better of me. I loved riding them!
Does seem a shame to have destroyed so many beautiful trams, however.

UrbanLegend said...

As I pointed out several sections back in this blog, the city should have (could have!) kept the route 11 Mount Royal tramline intact, updating and modernizing the equipment as needed while periodically running a vintage streetcar on it--of which many still exist at Exporail.

This would have made it unnecessary to blast away the tunnels and build the Camillien Houde roadway which, after many decades, has inevitably been wisely modified to accept fewer motorized vehicles to disturb the relative peace and tranquility of the mountain.

Former Mayor Tremblay's dream to re-instate tramlines on city streets is a dumb and expensive idea which won't see the light of day, but the south shore-Bonaventure-Old Montreal light rail plan could work.

M. P. and I. said...

In conjunction with this 1948 Tramways Track Diagram here are aerial photos of SOME of following locations appearing in photos on Coolopolis.


http://bp3.blogger.com/_H_qVyVvy8AI/Rt_3PniUVMI/AAAAAAAAC0Y/3Hx9mXhLxK0/s1600-h/Image0046.jpg


Tramways Ahuntsic Station. Millen and Henri Bourassa nee Kelly. Top Left.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P23-40.jpg


Tramways Loop at 'Limites'. Note start of Single Track with passing sidings East of here to Pigeon/Gouin. Henri Bourassa and J.J. Gagnier.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P23-47.jpg


Tramways at Pie IX. Note overpass width, single track and passing siding. Big plans in 1928 or whenever it was built? Note Pie IX beneath is a boulevard. Was this a proposed R of W. for a streetcar line never built account Depression and Autobuses??

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P23-51.jpg


Tramways Wye at Pigeon. Leger L'Archeveque and Pigeon.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P23-54.jpg


Youville Shops North End to 1944-built CNR from EJ/Vertu/Gohier to Pt Aux Trembles. East side of St Laurent.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P20-34.jpg

Youville Shops South End. East side St Laurent and Cremazie.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P19-33.jpg


Streetcar at end of steel at 56th Lachine and Rene Huguet.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P19-01.jpg

92 Streetcar West of later-45th where cars turned South.

http://archivesdemontreal.com/greffe/vues-aeriennes-archives/jpeg/VM97-3_7P18-03.jpg

Note old CNR Double Track from Turcot West via St. Pierre and Lachine to Dorval to right of streetcar R of W. CNR steel removed 1962.

Thank You.